Japan Travel Update

FCO advice on travel to Japan

We advise against all but essential travel to those areas in Japan most affected by the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. This includes those coastal areas of Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima prefectures which suffered extensive damage. These areas continue to experience disruptions to residential, business and transport infrastructure. There is also a continuing risk of aftershocks across the three prefectures. If your travel is essential, you should consult local contacts before travelling.

We advise against all travel to within a 60km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility. This is based on the latest scientific advice from the Scientific Advisory Group in Emergencies (SAGE). The Tokyo Metropolitan area and Narita airport lie outside this zone.

The situation in Japan outside of these specific areas has largely returned to normal and most visits are trouble free. In 2010 184,045 British nationals visited Japan. See General – Consular Assistance Statistics.

There is a continuous risk of earthquakes and tsunamis throughout Japan. Latest warnings and advisories are published on the Japan Meteorological Agency website.

Nuclear

British nationals should observe the advice being given by the Japanese authorities . The 20km zone around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant has been designated a restricted area. Anyone entering this area illegally is liable to a fine of up to 100,000 yen (approx £735) or detention. Outside the 20km zone, specific areas – predominantly within 30km of the nuclear plant, but in some cases further afield – have been designated either Planned Evacuation Zones (where evacuations have begun or are scheduled) or Emergency Evacuation Preparation Zones. These areas are shown on this map prepared by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, with the Planned Evacuation Zone marked in pink and the Emergency Evacuation Preparation Zone marked in yellow.

As a further precautionary measure, we advise against all travel to within a 60km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility. This is based on the latest scientific advice from the Scientific Advisory Group in Emergencies (SAGE). The background to this advice, which takes into account the latest developments at the Fukushima plant is explained in more detail here.

Although the situation at Fukushima will remain of concern for some time, the risks are gradually declining as facilities to stabilise the reactors are established. The Japanese authorities continue to provide regular updates on developments at Fukushima.

For full advice please see www.fco.gov.uk

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